Tag Archives: Peterborough Museum and Archives

Otonabee_ Ladies sitting by water

What’s In A (Place) Name?

What’s In A (Place) Name?

Have you ever wondered about the source of a lake, township, or community name? Origins of place names can be obvious, less obvious, obscure, or unknown. Their sources may be descriptive, based on natural or man-made features, or may derive from the names of landowners and prominent citizens, other towns or cities, indigenous words or

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old photo of general store

Off to the Cottage, in the Past

Tourism has been a part of life in the Kawarthas since the 1800s. Perhaps the area’s first tourists were Royal Navy Captain Basil Hall and his wife Margaret, who visited both Cobourg and Peterborough in 1827. The lakes and woods around Peterborough quickly gained a reputation for great fishing and hunting, drawing hunters and fishermen

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settlers on a boat

In the Shoes of Peterborough’s First Settlers – 1825

European settlement in this area is documented as having officially began in the year 1825 (although some found themselves settling here earlier). Emigrants left harsh conditions in Ireland for a better life in Canada. In total, nine ships were used to transport 2,024 people across the Atlantic. However, the conditions in steerage – the hold

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outside of Peterborough Museum

Treasures from the Toy Box

Each of the stories being shared, along with the toys being represented, come from the Peterborough Museum & Archives Permanent Collection of artifacts. The Great Garloo During the 1940s and 50s a craze of movie monsters attracted the imaginations of many youngsters.  In the early 1960s, the Marx Toy Company created several battery-operated toy monsters

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3 Ookpik

The Ookpik

On Exhibition The Ookpik alongside ‘Northern Owls’ According to the Canadian Encyclopedia, the Ookpik began as a traditional Inuit handicraft; a small snowy owl, typically made of sealskin became a popular Canadian symbol during the Philadelphia Trade Fair in 1963, where it was used to attract visitors to the federal government’s Department of Northern Affairs

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International Films Big in Peterborough

In 1998, the Peterborough Museum & Archives partnered with the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) Circuit Group to present The Red Violin, a film written by François Girard and Canadian, Don McKellar.  It was a great film (it won an Academy Award for “Best Music, Original Score” and was nominated for a number of other

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Warm Up to Your Museum

As the days shorten and wintry weather sets in, many Canadians dread the prospect of heading out into the cold.  Admittedly, winter weather has its obvious downsides – surfaces become treacherous, the bitter cold forces us to bundle up, and our morning commute usually includes some quality time spent clearing snow-filled driveways and icy windshields.

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